RawSpiceBar – March – Persian Spices

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RawSpiceBar is back with an exciting batch of spices for March. With March being Persian New Year month, they smartly put together a fun blend of spices that lets you dip your toes into any aspect of Persian cuisine.  Persian spices are similar to other Mediterranean spices, but I would say they have some subtleties that are unique to solely Persian cuisine. Persian spices are critical to maintaining the principal tenet of Persian cooking, which hot & cold. Everything in Persian cooking is about balancing “hot” foods & “cold” foods. That doesn’t mean spicy or hot in temperature, but rather food that generates energy in your body (think cinnamon). Cold doesn’t mean icy, but rather it’s a food that provides a cooling effect on your body (think mint).

This blend is fun and allows you to try Persian spices without having to invest in a whole variety of different Persian spices.

ADVIEH KHORESH – This is a really fun spice mix and honestly every good Persian cook has their own blend. The RawSpiceBar people did a good job of capturing some of the essentials of an Advieh mix. What is Advieh? Advieh is literally just means spice, so Advieh Khoresh means spice for khoresh. This is a spice blend of coriander, turmeric, cumin, pepper, saffron, and cinnamon. I’ve touched on khoresh before on this site and you can use this blend to basically make any of the major Iranian khoresh’s, but especially gheimeh. 

SAFFRON THREADS – High grade saffron is really critical to elevating your Persian cooking game. You can’t really serve any high end rice dish without saffron, it’s just not the same. This amount will allow you to test drive saffron without having to make the financial investment. I recommend you make saffron water to stretch this amount even further.  Saffron is  a major component to the Persian flavor profile and it’s also very prominent in Persian desserts.

MAST-O-KHIAR ROSE & HERBS – Mast-o-Khiar, literally translates to yogurt and cucumber. Yogurt is essential to every Persian dish and is used more like a condiment in Persian cooking. At every Persian dinner table, you will find a bowl of (at minimum) plain yogurt. If you’re having a party of want to elevate your yogurt, Persian cooks will often make Mast-o-Khiar, or yogurt with cucumber. It’s simple, it’s a diced cucumber mixed into the yogurt. Sometimes, chefs will just do that, but more often than not, you add some spices to the mixture to elevate it to something out of this world. This is a mixture of dill, mint, black pepper, and rose petals. It works perfectly with the yogurt and goes really well with a kabob or khoresh.

Per the usual, RawSpiceBar knocked it out of the park. If you haven’t already signed up, I really recommend you do so. It’s outrageously cheap for the stuff they give you each week. I’ve said this before but I’ll say it again, you could either buy a mediocre sandwich for the cost of this subscription, or buy this subscription and elevate your cooking for a whole week!

Sausage, Egg, and Cheese Sandwich | Sausage, Egg, and Cheese Sandwich

 

egg and cheese sandwich sausage 1

The breakfast sandwich is everyone’s favorite breakfast item. That’s right, I speak for everyone. Okay well it might not be EVERYONE’s favorite, but I would venture to say that if I put one in front of you at 7AM you wouldn’t turn it down.

The breakfast sandwich itself gained notoriety in the late 19th century early 20th century. Before you know it, people were chowing down on breakfast sandwiches while they were doing the Charleston. Your standard breakfast sandwich has some kind of breakfast meat (i.e. sausage, bacon, ham, or scrapple), eggs, and hopefully some kind of cheese. The combination creates some sort of savory unholy trinity, it’s so good. Too good even.

For many folks in America, breakfast sandwiches immediately bring up imagery of fast food chains. I would guess that the breakfast sandwich didn’t really become the juggernaut it is today until the fast food boom of the late 60’s. With Americans on the go-go they wanted to know-know that they could eat their food on the run. Insert breakfast sandwiches. It’s like eggs and bacon, but in your hand! Or something like that.

My ideal breakfast sandwich has real breakfast sausage in it. I typically like to take the breakfast sausage out of the casing and form little patties. But for this go around, I poached the sausages first, then I cut them in half and sauted them. This allowed me to build some more flavor in the sausage.

I like to use sunny side up eggs in my sandwiches, I think it allows for the yolk to build more flavor in the sandwich than your typical scrambled variety. Then, I put some shredded cheese on the toast, to really up the ante.

Finally, I butter the toast on it’s outsides and then I press it in my frying pan (the one I sauteed the sausage in). The end result is deliciousness.

This is fairly simple, but it’s ultra satisfying.

 

Sausage Egg and Cheese

 

 

Ingredients

2 Eggs Sunny Side Up

1 Breakfast Sausage

1 Slice of Cheese

1 oz. of Shredded Cheese

1 Tbsp. Butter

Method

Poach the sausage in water, once it is cooked, slice them in half and brown in a pan. Set aside.

Cook the eggs sunny side up, make sure you don’t overcook the yolks. Add a little bit of cheese onto the yolks.

Assemble on your toast, first cheese, then eggs, and finally the sausage.

In a pan, heat the butter and brown your sandwich on each side, flattening it slightly with a spatula.

 

Sausage Egg and Cheese

 

Sausage, Egg, and Cheese Sandwich
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • 2 Eggs Sunny Side Up
  • 1 Breakfast Sausage
  • 1 Slice of Cheese
  • 1 oz. of Shredded Cheese
  • 1 Tbsp. Butter
Instructions
  1. Poach the sausage in water, once it is cooked, slice them in half and brown in a pan. Set aside.
  2. Cook the eggs sunny side up, make sure you don't overcook the yolks. Add a little bit of cheese onto the yolks.
  3. Assemble on toast, first cheese, then eggs, and finally the sausage.
  4. In a pan, heat the butter and brown your sandwich on each side, flattening it slightly with a spatula.